News

Welcome to the office, Family Nurse Practitioner, Jill Machado


 

Jill Machado, MSN, FNP-C
RN: Oregon Health Sciences University, 1997
MSN: Gonzaga University, 2004
Board Certified: American Association of Nurse Practitioners, 2004

Jill is a Family Nurse Practitioner, board-certified by the American Association of Nurse Practitioners, and licensed by the State of California to provide health care to patients of all ages. Her focus over the last 12 years has been providing care to Obstetrical and Gynecological patients. Her scope of practice encompass health promotion, disease prevention, diagnosis and management of common and complex healthcare problems within the women’s health arena.

Jill joined Dr. Bettencourt in July 2016 and will provide women’s health services to the practice. “I am excited to join Dr. Bettencourt’s office. We share the philosophy of providing professional, compassionate, accessible and timely care that is based upon the best available medical evidence.” In addition to providing women’s health care, Jill will be expanding care to also provide basic family practice services as well.

On a personal front, Jill has lived on the Central Coast since 2009, practicing in San Luis Obispo and Templeton. Jill, her husband Rick, and their son Jack, reside on a ranch in Shandon, California.

 

Influenza/Flu


 

What is influenza?


Woman with handkerchiefInfluenza (also called “the flu”) is a viral infection in the nose, throat and lungs. About 10% to 20% of Americans get the flu each year.
Some people can get very sick from the flu. Each year, about 200,000 people go to a hospital with the flu, and 36,000 people die because of the flu and complications.

The flu may cause fever, cough, sore throat, a runny or stuffy nose, headache, muscle aches and tiredness. Most people feel better after 1 or 2 weeks, but for some people, the flu leads to serious diseases, such as pneumonia. The influenza vaccine can help protect you from getting the flu.

Who is at higher risk?

The following people have a higher risk of flu complications:
  • All children from 6 months up to 19 years of age
  • All adults 50 years of age and older
  • All women who are or will be pregnant during the flu season
  • People who are living in nursing homes or long-term-care facilities
  • Individuals who have long-term health problems
  • Health care workers who have direct contact with patients
  • Caregivers and household contacts of children less than 6 months of age

What is H1N1 flu?

The H1N1 influenza (also called swine influenza or swine flu) is a respiratory infection caused by a virus found in pigs. H1N1 flu can infect humans.

How can I avoid getting the flu?

The best way to avoid getting the flu is to get the influenza vaccine. You should get the vaccine as soon as it becomes available each fall, but you can also get it any time throughout the flu season (into December, January and beyond). The vaccine is available by shot or by nasal spray. The vaccines work by exposing your immune system to the flu virus. Your body will build up antibodies to the virus to protect you from getting the flu. The flu shot contains dead viruses. The nasal-spray vaccine contains live but weakened viruses. You cannot get the flu from the flu shot or the nasal-spray vaccine.You can also reduce your risk of catching the flu by washing your hands frequently, which stops the spread of germs. Eating healthy, exercising and getting enough sleep also play a part in preventing the flu because they help boost your immune system.If you are sick, make sure that you cover your mouth when you cough and wash your hands often to prevent giving the flu to others.Some people who get the vaccine will still get the flu, but they will usually get a milder case than people who aren’t vaccinated. The vaccine is especially recommended for people who are more likely to get really sick from flu-related complications.


Should I get the flu vaccine?

Yes. All persons who are 6 months of age or older should get the flu vaccine as long as there are no contraindications. Read full influenza article at http://familydoctor.org/online/famdocen/home/healthy/vaccines/477.html.